10/09/2009

the whole and its parts . the bride of part(ing[s])

for the twentieth first century artist this section
the Whole and its Parts
(section 6 A/O)


is one of the most freeing as it summarizes nearly all the aspirations, goals, desires, failures, fears, needs for explanation, and canny difficulties that face one. Dream of whole part and the proxy bet ween them.


p-42-3

“We live today in the age of partial objects, bricks that have been

shattered to bits, and leftovers. We no longer believe in the myth of the

existence of fragments that, like pieces of an antique statue, are merely

waiting for the last one to be turned up, so that they may all be glued

back together to create a unity that is precisely the same as the original

unity.

We no longer believe in a primordial totality that once existed, or

in a final totality that awaits us at some future date. We no longer believe

in the dull gray outlines of a dreary, colorless dialectic of evolution,

aimed at forming a harmonious whole out of heterogeneous bits by

rounding off their rough edges. We believe only in totalities that are

peripheral.

And if we discover such a totality alongside various separate

parts, it is a whole of these particular parts but does not totalize them; it

is a unity of all of these particular parts but does not unify them; rather,

it is added to them as a new part fabricated separately."

At this moment of A/O
Guattari and Deleuze discuss Proust’s conception (via Balzac) role as desire wizard of the part that is not subsumed in to holes or/wholes. The artist creates a line that pulls one out of the black hole, a line that shoots across the page __________________
Down in the black hole __________________death___ Outside
drawstrings of creation _________________>
<> Deleuze had previously written AntiLogos The Literary Machine in his Proust and Signs book before hooking up with Felix Guattari-- the work in A/O took it a step further.
One thousand steps eventually.

"It comes into being, but applying this time to the whole as some

inspired fragment composed separately. . . ." So Proust writes of the

unity of Balzac's creation, though his remark is also an apt description

of his own oeuvre

In the literary machine that Proust's In Search of

Lost Time constitutes, we are struck by the fact that all the parts are

produced as asymmetrical sections, paths that suddenly come to an end,

hermetically sealed boxes, noncommunicating vessels, watertight compartments, in which there are gaps even between things that are

contiguous, gaps that are affirmations, pieces of a puzzle belonging not

to any one puzzle but to many, pieces assembled by forcing them into a

certain place where they may or may not belong, their unmatched edges

violently bent out of shape, forcibly made to fit together, to interlock,

with a number of pieces always left over.”

LIkewise the becomings of the similar asymmetrical paths of Surrealism. The bifurcations and disparate debouching of thought and word became the crying call of

Artaud __ Dada before Artaud and surrealism _ esp. in the poetry of Tzara

had gone a long way to mixing and mashing the non-fitting pieces of

puzzles. French Critics incensed at Tristan Tzara's experiments with a-centered

language esp. those of The first Celestial Adventure of Mister AnTipYrine

___accused him of not knowing the french language , thus explaining

his experiments! of being incompetent in the Fr ench language!

it is the french language that is too competent too rational!

par chance it was french critic who were incompentent. Remember the famous

story of James Joyce finding grammar mistakes in two of Flaubert's

published stories __ which none of the famed french readers noticed.

___________________

In reality "the" French (one needs to rid one self of the 'the') was and remains incompetent and unequal to the body of experience that is not fascist :French is the language of the racist master.They

simply could not absorb the daring splits Tzzara pulled off

in his verse___ French as with most dominant languages is the command center of assholes until one

wrenches it back for oneself. One has to retool the lAnGuAge daIly for one (our) selves.



Tzara was not shy to make nouns perform as verbs or to verb nouns


___________________________

As I leg wind ledge truck face the ruin of the baloon of cutting. Add to this the irreverent and non conventioanl sound play in his verse and one

imagine these prissy stiff critics going right around the bend. Just as critics and even reactive_poets do still__ One wants to published so one conforms to the norms set by others __ yet who are these idiots? Publishers? what the hell is a publisher?

Are there such beings?

. One sees hundreds of cliques daily describing and delimiting the forms a poem must take. And what it must not. ArSeHoles of the body and poem.


_________________ Guattari continues :

|||||

“It is a schizoid work par

excellence: it is almost as though the author's guilt, his confessions of

guilt are merely a sort of joke. (In Kleinian terms, it might be said that

the depressive position is only a cover-up for a more deeply rooted

schizoid attitude.)"

Deleuze resumes:


"For the rigors of the law are only an apparent

expression of the protest of the One, whereas their real object is the

absolution of fragmented universes, in which the law never unites

anything in a single Whole, but on the contrary measures and maps out

the divergences, the dispersions, the exploding into fragments of

something that is innocent precisely because its source is madness."


Truer and purer lines have never been written.

Because its source is madness.

somewhere Foucault talks about Folly

being the last taboo.

One has had gay liberatiion and women's liberation

and many other important movements

__ why has there been no successful

folly liberation?

Folly is so deep

so embound

in the

gravities of civilization

its compact

bond cannot be

found to be undone

and opened Out

?



Guattari and Deleuze discourse again:


Gilles: "This

is why in Proust's work the apparent theme of guilt is tightly interwoven

with a completely different theme totally contradicting it; the plantlike

innocence that results from the total compartmentalization of the sexes,

both in Charlus's encounters and in Albertine's slumber, where flowers

blossom in profusion and the utter innocence of madness is revealed,

whether it be the patent madness of Charlus or the supposed madness of

Albertine

produced as nothing more than a part alongside other parts, which it

neither unifies nor totalizes, though it has an effect on these other parts

simply because it establishes aberrant paths of communication between

noncommunicating vessels, transverse unities between elements that

retain all their differences within their own particular boundaries."

Felix:

"Thus

in the trip on the train in In Search of Lost Time, there is never a totality

of what is seen nor a unity of the points of view, except along the

transversal that the frantic passenger traces from one window to the

other, "in order to draw together, in order to reweave intermittent and

opposite fragments." This drawing together, this reweaving is what

Joyce called re-embodying. "



Gilles and Felix EnSemble Assemglage: "The body without organs is produced as a

whole, but in its own particular place within the process of production,

alongside the parts that it neither unifies nor totalizes. And when it

operates on them, when it turns back upon them (se rabat sur elles), it

brings about transverse communications, transfinite summarizations,

polyvocal and transcursive inscriptions on its own surface, on which the

functional breaks of partial objects are continually intersected by breaks

in the signifying chains, and by breaks effected by a subject that uses

them as reference points in order to locate itself."

Pause


"The whole not only

coexists with all the parts; it is contiguous to them, it exists as a product

that is produced apart from them and yet at the same time is related to

them. Geneticists have noted the same phenomenon in the particular

language of their science: ". . . amino acids are assimilated individually

into the cell, and then are arranged in the proper sequence by a

mechanism analogous to a template onto which the distinctive side chain

of each acid keys into its proper position."

RePause:


"As a general rule, the

problem of the relationships between parts and the whole continues to

be rather awkwardly formulated by classic mechanism and vitalism, so

long as the whole is considered as a totality derived from the parts, or as

an original totality from which the parts emanate, or as a dialectical

totalization. " One thousand step in the nontotalized saunter. One saunter to the rain bust. One statue branch.


ReSume: disperses the old arguments of vitalism versus mechanism:

"Neither mechanism nor vitalism has really understood the

nature of desiring-machines, nor the twofold need to consider

coexists with all the parts; it is contiguous to them,

(we are beside )

it exists as a product (door to door)

that is produced apart from them and yet at the same time is related to

them. Geneticists have noted the same phenomenon in the particular[links to contemporary work in genetics]

language of their science: ". . . amino acids are assimilated individually

into the cell, and then are arranged in the proper sequence by a

mechanism analogous to a template onto which the distinctive side chain

of each acid keys into its proper position."


"As a general rule, the

problem of the relationships between parts and the whole continues to

be rather awkwardly formulated by classic mechanism and vitalism, so

long as the whole is considered as a totality derived from the parts, or as

an original totality from which the parts emanate, or as a dialectical

totalization." ______________ One wants no more emanations and dialectial rushes.

____________________ End classic paradigms. Its a wonder we discuss them still.

Neither mechanism nor vitalism has really understood the

nature of desiring-machines, nor the twofold need to consider

the role of



(desiring machines become Assemblages: these are term toys to use as one sees

fit or/and useful)


production in desire and the role of desire in mechanics."





End of one of the most intensive [there are threads in this passage which burrow to others in the book, and later to One Thousand Plateaus] passages in A/O: and one wonders how this is a great book? A book for everyone and no one . A monstrous masterpiece which opens out dozens of door for reader and writer , artist and bricoleur.